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We are actively seeking updated information for all trees in the register. If you have information about this tree that we don't currently have recorded, or wish to advise of an inaccuracy please use our information submission form to help us build a complete profile of this tree.
It has been more than ten years since we recorded a measurement for this tree. If you are able to provide us with new measurements please fill out the information submission form for this tree.

Tree Information x

Identifier: WPR/0001
Registered By: La France, K.
Genus: Quercus
Species: robur
Common names: English oak,
Height: 2.30 m
Diameter: 2.5 cm
Avg. Crown Spread: 0.00 m
Champion Tree Score: 11

Location

Suburb: Tuxedo
City/Town: Winnipeg
Region: Winnipeg
   
 
General Notes:


 x
The Original Chortitza Oak (pronounced kor-teet-za) in Ukraine was, and still is, a symbol of life to many Mennonites who met under it’s canopy; growing and surviving in the face of many hardships. This magnificent tree was once an important meeting place to thousands of Mennonites leaving Prussia in search of a better life. At 118 feet high, and over 20 feet in circumference, it’s no wonder that this tree served as a focal point for the Ukraine community. Germinating in about 1300 BC, The Chortitza Oak witnessed 700 years of history including the death of Marco Polo in 1328, the day that Galileo proved the earth moved around the sun in 1610, sheltered Mennonite immigrants in 1789, and witnessed Napoleon’s invasion of Moscow in 1812. The oak witnessed the struggles of the Ukrainian people under Stalin’s dictatorship, and then saw the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Unfortunately, at that time, the oak also began to decline. Many Canadians can trace their roots back to the ancestors who once met beneath this tree. Over the decades, visitors to the Chortitza homeland brought back acorns and seedlings gently wrapped in handkerchiefs to grow themselves. One person who did just that was John R. Friesen, a retired minister who now serves as a lay pastor at First Mennonite Church in Winnipeg, but he was unsuccessful. Friends Abe and Eleanor Epp of Niagara-on-the-Lake, provided John and his wife with a sapling In 2006, which they donated to Canadian Mennonite University to mark their 50th wedding anniversary. The tree was planted on CMU’s south campus, near the Mennonite Heritage Centre.“To my knowledge, this is the first ‘Chortitza oak’ offspring in Winnipeg,” said Friesen, who traces his roots back to that settlement. “It will serve as a reminder of a heritage to which many of us connect.”
Sections reprinted with permission of Canadian Mennonite University
(J. Longhurst, 2006)
Other Sources:
Canadian Mennonite Vol 10, No.14, 2006
Winnipeg Free Press (June 23, 2006)

Filename: MB.0001Q.robur.c.jpg, Image Credit: Manitoba Free Press. All rights reserved. Permission must be obtained before any reuse of this image.

Tree Information x

Identifier: WPR/0001
Tree Type: Single
Registered By: La France, K.
Registration Category: Provincial Heritage Tree- Notable Tree
General Notes:


 x
The Original Chortitza Oak (pronounced kor-teet-za) in Ukraine was, and still is, a symbol of life to many Mennonites who met under it’s canopy; growing and surviving in the face of many hardships. This magnificent tree was once an important meeting place to thousands of Mennonites leaving Prussia in search of a better life. At 118 feet high, and over 20 feet in circumference, it’s no wonder that this tree served as a focal point for the Ukraine community. Germinating in about 1300 BC, The Chortitza Oak witnessed 700 years of history including the death of Marco Polo in 1328, the day that Galileo proved the earth moved around the sun in 1610, sheltered Mennonite immigrants in 1789, and witnessed Napoleon’s invasion of Moscow in 1812. The oak witnessed the struggles of the Ukrainian people under Stalin’s dictatorship, and then saw the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Unfortunately, at that time, the oak also began to decline. Many Canadians can trace their roots back to the ancestors who once met beneath this tree. Over the decades, visitors to the Chortitza homeland brought back acorns and seedlings gently wrapped in handkerchiefs to grow themselves. One person who did just that was John R. Friesen, a retired minister who now serves as a lay pastor at First Mennonite Church in Winnipeg, but he was unsuccessful. Friends Abe and Eleanor Epp of Niagara-on-the-Lake, provided John and his wife with a sapling In 2006, which they donated to Canadian Mennonite University to mark their 50th wedding anniversary. The tree was planted on CMU’s south campus, near the Mennonite Heritage Centre.“To my knowledge, this is the first ‘Chortitza oak’ offspring in Winnipeg,” said Friesen, who traces his roots back to that settlement. “It will serve as a reminder of a heritage to which many of us connect.”
Sections reprinted with permission of Canadian Mennonite University
(J. Longhurst, 2006)
Other Sources:
Canadian Mennonite Vol 10, No.14, 2006
Winnipeg Free Press (June 23, 2006)

Single Tree Details

Genus: Quercus
Species: robur
Common names: English oak,
Given Name: Winnipeg Chortitza oak
Height: 2.30m
Height measurement method: Direct Method - Pole
Height Comments: (none)
Girth: 8 cm
Girth measurement height: 1.3000 m
Girth Comments: (none)
Diameter: 2.5 cm
Crown Spread A: 0.00m
Crown Spread B: 0.00m
Avg. Crown Spread: 0.00m
Actual Planting Date: Jun 2006
Approx. Planting Date:
e.g. circa. 1860
Current Age: 13 years
Tree Health Description: (none)
Tree Form Type: Single Trunk
Number of Trunks: 1
Tree Form Comments: (none)
Champion Tree Score: 11
Local Protection Status: No
Tree Physically Present: Yes
Heritage Score: 0

Observations

Date Observer Action
23 Jun 2006 La France, K

Location

Latitude: 49.857077
Longitude: -97.232405
Location Name: Canadian Mennonite University
Address: 2325 Grant Avenue
Suburb: Tuxedo
City/Town: Winnipeg
Region: Winnipeg
Location Description: Located on the south campus, near the Mennonite Heritage Centre
Public Accessibility: School/University
Local Authority: City of Winnipeg

Images

Preview Credit Date
Manitoba Free Press 23 Jun 2006
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